Tuesday, July 28, 2015

TIME OUT'S 100 BEST MOVIES OF ALL-TIME


Time Out magazine asked a group of over seventy actors, including Oscar-winner Juliette Binoche, Trainwreck's Bill Hader and Brie Larson, and motion-capture king Andy Serkis, to name the ten best movies of all-time. They then took those lists and combined them to form a "definitive" (see: "odd") list of the 100 Best Movies of All-Time. Most of the usual suspects appear somewhere, though some of the rankings are a bit strange.

The Godfather landed at #2, just like it did on the BBC's list of the 100 Greatest American Films that came out last week. Citizen Kane, the film that topped the BBC's list, as well as most other lists of this type, came in all the way down at #39. So what monumental film knocked Charles Foster Kane off the top? Tootsie. Yep, the 1982 Dustin Hoffman comedy Tootsie was named the best movie of all-time. I know, right? Actors sure do love them some Dustin Hoffman. Guess I'm going to have to re-watch it, as the last couple times I've seen it it did not feel like it aged well at all.

Perhaps the most notable snub was the almost complete absence of Alfred Hitchcock films, whose only entry was Notorious at #62, while universally recognized classics like Vertigo and Psycho failed to make the list at all. There were quite a few other eye openers as well, as several little talked about films like The Celebration (#41), The Turin Horse (#51), The Sacrifice (#66), and A Room For Romeo Brass (#78) all made surprise appearances. Overall it's a very perplexing list, but then again any list like this is entirely subjective, so really who cares?

But seriously, Waiting For Guffman ahead of Citizen Kane? Really? Here's the entire list: 

#1 Tootsie

1-20


#32 There Will Be Blood

21-40


#46 Casablanca

41-60


#65 It's a Wonderful Life

61-80


#86 The Grand Budapest Hotel

81-100


#100 Schindler's List
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Here's a sampling of ten top ten lists, from some of the more notable names who added their two cents to the list:










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LATE NIGHT HIGHLIGHT: Lip Sync Battle with Tom Cruise and Jimmy Fallon


Found on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon YouTube channel.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

UNIVERSAL ANNOUNCES 'JURASSIC WORLD' SEQUEL FOR 2018

Universal had 1.5 billion reasons to greenlight a Jurassic World sequel, and today they confirmed just that. The flick, slated for summer of 2018, will bring back leads Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard, executive producer Steven Spielberg. Director and co-writer Colin Trevorrow is co-writing the screenplay, but Variety (who broke the story) did not specifically outline if he would direct as well, though it's likely.

HAPPY NATIONAL HOT DOG DAY

COMING SOON: 'SPECTRE' Official Trailer

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

'CITIZEN KANE' TOPS THE BBC'S "100 GREATEST AMERICAN FILMS" LIST


Movie lists are a great way to strike up a conversation about what makes a great film, and what films meet those perceived standards. They are fun, kinda pointless, and sometimes really perturbing. Sometimes they confirm what most people already believe (Citizen Kane is pretty great), while sometimes shining a light on films that may have been overlooked in their time but deserve a second look.

The BBC recently polled a group of international critics to get their consensus on what the greatest American films of all-time are. “In recognition of the astounding influence of the US on what remains the most popular art-form worldwide, BBC Culture has polled 62 international film critics to determine the 100 greatest American films of all time.” The results yield a crop of familiar favorites and some real headscratchers (Gone With the Wind next to Heaven's Gate?).

The top of the list is loaded with familiar faces like The GodfatherVertigo, and of course Citizen Kane. Further down the list are some bold choices to say the least, with Orson Welles' Kane follow-up The Magnificent Ambersons astoundingly high at #11, even though most people have never actually seen Welles' original, much longer cut of the film. Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon appears at #27, well ahead of his Dr Strangelove (#42), and his Eyes Wide Shut (#61) also beat the more conventional choice of The Shining (#62).

The list is full of other surprises, like the avant-garde Meshes of the Afternoon (#40), the documentary Grey Gardens (#53), and the previously mentioned Heaven's Gate. That Michael Cimino film almost single-handedly ended the "New Hollywood" movement in American cinema because it bombed in such epic proportions, though like Welles' Ambersons a "Directors Cut" of the film has gained a cult following in the years since its original release.

Here's the complete list...

THE BBC’S 100 GREATEST AMERICAN FILMS

100. Ace in the Hole (Billy Wilder, 1951)
99. 12 Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, 2013)
98. Heaven’s Gate (Michael Cimino, 1980)
97. Gone With the Wind (Victor Fleming, 1939)
96. The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan, 2008)
95. Duck Soup (Leo McCarey, 1933)
94. 25th Hour (Spike Lee, 2002)
93. Mean Streets (Martin Scorsese, 1973)
92. The Night of the Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
91. ET: The Extra-Terrestrial (Steven Spielberg, 1982)
90. Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
89. In a Lonely Place (Nicholas Ray, 1950)
88. West Side Story (Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, 1961)
87. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
86. The Lion King (Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff, 1994)
85. Night of the Living Dead (George A Romero, 1968)
84. Deliverance (John Boorman, 1972)
83. Bringing Up Baby (Howard Hawks, 1938)
82. Raiders of the Lost Ark (Steven Spielberg, 1981)
81. Thelma & Louise (Ridley Scott, 1991)
80. Meet Me in St Louis (Vincente Minnelli, 1944)
79. The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
78. Schindler’s List (Steven Spielberg, 1993)
77. Stagecoach (John Ford, 1939)
76. The Empire Strikes Back (Irvin Kershner, 1980)
75. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Steven Spielberg, 1977)

74. Forrest Gump (Robert Zemeckis, 1994)
73. Network (Sidney Lumet, 1976)
72. The Shanghai Gesture (Josef von Sternberg, 1941)
71. Groundhog Day (Harold Ramis, 1993)
70. The Band Wagon (Vincente Minnelli, 1953)
69. Koyaanisqatsi (Godfrey Reggio, 1982)
68. Notorious (Alfred Hitchcock, 1946)
67. Modern Times (Charlie Chaplin, 1936)
66. Red River (Howard Hawks, 1948)
65. The Right Stuff (Philip Kaufman, 1965)
64. Johnny Guitar (Nicholas Ray, 1954)
63. Love Streams (John Cassavetes, 1984)
62. The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
61. Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)
60. Blue Velvet (David Lynch, 1986)
59. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Miloš Forman, 1975)
58. The Shop Around the Corner (Ernst Lubitsch, 1940)
57. Crimes and Misdemeanors (Woody Allen, 1989)
56. Back to the Future (Robert Zemeckis, 1985)
55. The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967)
54. Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950)
53. Grey Gardens (Albert and David Maysles, Ellen Hovde and Muffie Meyer, 1975)
52. The Wild Bunch (Sam Peckinpah, 1969)
51. Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958)

50. His Girl Friday (Howard Hawks, 1940)
49. Days of Heaven (Terrence Malick, 1978)
48. A Place in the Sun (George Stevens, 1951)
47. Marnie (Alfred Hitchcock, 1964)
46. It’s a Wonderful Life (Frank Capra, 1946)
45. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (John Ford, 1962)
44. Sherlock Jr (Buster Keaton, 1924)
43. Letter from an Unknown Woman (Max Ophüls, 1948)
42. Dr Strangelove (Stanley Kubrick, 1964)
41. Rio Bravo (Howard Hawks, 1959)
40. Meshes of the Afternoon (Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid, 1943)
39. The Birth of a Nation (DW Griffith, 1915)
38. Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975)
37. Imitation of Life (Douglas Sirk, 1959)
36. Star Wars (George Lucas, 1977)
35. Double Indemnity (Billy Wilder, 1944)
34. The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming, 1939)
33. The Conversation (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)
32. The Lady Eve (Preston Sturges, 1941)
31. A Woman Under the Influence (John Cassavetes, 1974)
30. Some Like It Hot (Billy Wilder, 1959)
29. Raging Bull (Martin Scorsese, 1980)
28. Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994)
27. Barry Lyndon (Stanley Kubrick, 1975)
26. Killer of Sheep (Charles Burnett, 1978)

25. Do the Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989)
24. The Apartment (Billy Wilder, 1960)
23. Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1977)
22. Greed (Erich von Stroheim, 1924)
21. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)
20. Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990)
19. Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, 1976)
18. City Lights (Charlie Chaplin, 1931)
17. The Gold Rush (Charlie Chaplin, 1925)
16. McCabe & Mrs Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)
15. The Best Years of Our Lives (William Wyler, 1946)
14. Nashville (Robert Altman, 1975)
13. North by Northwest (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959)
12. Chinatown (Roman Polanski, 1974)
11. The Magnificent Ambersons (Orson Welles, 1942)
10. The Godfather Part II (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)
9. Casablanca (Michael Curtiz, 1942)
8. Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
7. Singin’ in the Rain (Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly, 1952)
6. Sunrise (FW Murnau, 1927)
5. The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)
4. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
3. Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
2. The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)
1. Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)

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Tuesday, July 7, 2015

"LEGO MOVIE" DIRECTORS TAPPED TO DIRECT HAN SOLO STAR WARS ANTHOLOGY FILM

The dynamic directing duo of Christopher Miller and Phil Lord have been tapped to direct the next Star Wars Anthology film, which will feature Han Solo. Here's the details from StarWars.com...

"CHRISTOPHER MILLER AND PHIL LORD TO HELM HAN SOLO ANTHOLOGY FILM
THE DUO BEHIND THE LEGO MOVIE WILL DIRECT AN EARLY TALE OF THE SMUGGLER-TURNED-HERO, WITH A SCREENPLAY BY LAWRENCE AND JON KASDAN."

"The next adventure in the Anthology series of Star Wars films will be directed by Christopher Miller and Phil Lord, whose credits include the critically acclaimed The LEGO Movie and Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, as well as 21 Jump Street and 22 Jump Street. Among the most sought-after filmmakers working today, the two have proven a formidable duo on the multiple films they’ve collaborated on and are looking forward to applying their unique creative chemistry to the Star Wars universe."

Monday, July 6, 2015

SEE "ANT-MAN" IN ADVANCE (AND FOR FREE!)

Lucky folks in these 11 cities have a chance to see an advanced screening of Marvel's Ant-Man for free. Register soon at http://www.seeitfirst.net/ as tickets are limited.

See you in L.A.!

Sunday, July 5, 2015

"JURASSIC WORLD" WINS 4TH WEEKEND IN A ROW OVER 4TH OF JULY HOLIDAY

Jurassic World held off Inside Out, Magic Mike XXL, Terminator: Genisys and Ted 2 to win its FOURTH straight weekend at the box office. This is only the third time this year a film has managed to pull that off at the domestic box office, after American Sniper and Furious 7 did the same earlier this year.

All numbers found on BoxOfficeMojo.com

Saturday, July 4, 2015

4TH OF JULY MULTIPLEX MEMORIES


This weekend's box office race is tighter than Channing Tatum's abs, with newcomers Magic Mike XXL and Terminator: Genisys trying to fight off holdovers Jurassic World, Inside Out and Ted 2 for 4th of July weekend supremacy. The Independence Day holiday has long been a competitive weekend for Hollywood, as many Americans try to beat the summer heat and head indoors to their local multiplex to check out the latest blockbuster.

I fondly remember spending many a Fourth of July in the mid-to-late nineties with friends at their summer house in Northern Minnesota and heading to the movie theater in Detroit Lakes to see the likes of Independence Day, Men in Black and Armageddon on the big screen. That was a pretty solid era to be a teenage boy at the movies.

Below is a list of the twenty highest grossing Independence Day weekends from 1982 to the present, adjusted for inflation. All data was found at BoxOfficeMojo.com


HAPPY 4TH OF JULY EVERYONE!

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HAPPY 4TH OF JULY FROM STEVEN SPIELBERG AND BRUCE THE SHARK

Friday, July 3, 2015

30 YEARS OF "BACK TO THE FUTURE"


"He was never in time for his classes...
He wasn't in time for his dinner...
Then one day... he wasn't in his time at all."

GREAT SCOTT!!! It's been thirty years since Robert Zemeckis gave us one the most adored films of all-time: Back to the Future. Starring 1980's darlings Michael J. Fox and Lea Thompson, and featuring unforgettable turns by Christopher Lloyd, Crispin Glover and Thomas F. Wilson, a classic 80's soundtrack and cameo from Huey Lewis, and executive produced by the Amblin super team of Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall, the film is loaded with memorable scenes and lines. The film's screenplay, co-written by Bob Gale, was one of the hottest properties in Hollywood history, and was voted one of the 101 greatest screenplays ever by the Writers Guild of America.

The film was a box office smash, becoming one of the ten highest-grossing films off all-time up until that point, joining the likes of E.T., Star Wars, and Jaws.


It would finish as the highest-grossing film of 1985, and to this day remains in the top ten in over a dozen different box office records according to BoxOfficeMojo.com.


Even adjusted for inflation, Back to the Future remains one of the biggest films of the 1980's.


The film also gave us one of the coolest cars in cinema history: Doc Brown's DeLorean time machine.


THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES!
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